Death Valley Photos: Owlshead Mountains

Owlshead Mountains, Death Valley: Double-click on image to enlarge.

Owlshead Mountains, Death Valley: Double-click on image to enlarge.

Owlshead Mountains, Death Valley: Double-click on image to enlarge.

Owlshead Mountains, Death Valley: Double-click on image to enlarge.

Death Valley Photos: Chloride City and Monarch Canyon

Chloride City, Death Valley: Double-click image to enlarge.

Chloride City, Death Valley: Double-click image to enlarge.

Desert Bighorn Sheep, Chloride Cliff, Death Valley: Double-click image to enlarge.

Desert Bighorn Sheep, Chloride Cliff, Death Valley: Double-click image to enlarge.

Death Valley Photos: Titus Canyon

Titus Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click image to enlarge.

Titus Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click image to enlarge.

Titus Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click image to enlarge.

Titus Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click image to enlarge.

Titus Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click image to enlarge.

Titus Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click image to enlarge.

Titus Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click image to enlarge.

Titus Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click image to enlarge.

Titus Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click image to enlarge.

Titus Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click image to enlarge.

Death Valley Photos: Coyote, Hole in The Wall

The blog has been dormant the last 2 weeks during my exploration of the Deep South, including Cajun Country.  I’ll wrap up the remaining Death Valley and Texas stories this week and then detail my newest adventures.

This coyote was standing in the middle of Badwater Road, a two-lane, 55 mph highway.  I called him over to the shoulder and he came immediately.  He minded better than my dog at home.   See canyon photos below.

Coyote on Badwater Road, Death Valley: Double-click image to enlarge.

Coyote on Badwater Road, Death Valley: Double-click image to enlarge.

Coyote on Badwater Road, Death Valley: Double-click image to enlarge.

Coyote on Badwater Road, Death Valley: Double-click image to enlarge.

Hole in the Wall, Death Valley: Double-click on image to enlarge.

Hole in the Wall, Death Valley: Double-click on image to enlarge.

Hole in the Wall, Death Valley: Double-click on image to enlarge.

Hole in the Wall, Death Valley: Double-click on image to enlarge.

Hole in the Wall, Death Valley: Double-click on image to enlarge.

Hole in the Wall, Death Valley: Double-click on image to enlarge.

Campsite,  Hole in the Wall Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click on image to enlarge.

Campsite, Hole in the Wall Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click on image to enlarge.

Death Valley Photos: Echo and Mosaic Canyons, Artists Drive, Ubehebe Crater

Eye of the Needle, Echo Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click on image to enlarge.

Eye of the Needle, Echo Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click on image to enlarge.

Eye of the Needle, Echo Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click on image to enlarge.

Eye of the Needle, Echo Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click on image to enlarge.

Inyo Mine, Echo Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click on image to enlarge.

Inyo Mine, Echo Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click on image to enlarge.

Artists Drive, Death Valley: Double-click image to enlarge.

Artists Drive, Death Valley: Double-click image to enlarge.

Mosaic Canyon, with new friends.

Mosaic Canyon, with new friends.

Ubehebe Crater, Death Valley: Double-click on image to enlarge.

Ubehebe Crater, Death Valley: Double-click on image to enlarge.

Death Valley Photos: Zabriskie Point

Zabriskie Point: Double-click on photo to enlarge

Zabriskie Point: Double-click on photo to enlarge

Zabriskie Point: Double-click on photo to enlarge

Zabriskie Point: Double-click on photo to enlarge

Zabriskie Point: Double-click on photo to enlarge

Zabriskie Point: Double-click on photo to enlarge

Zabriskie Point: Double-click on photo to enlarge

Zabriskie Point: Double-click on photo to enlarge

Zabriskie Point: Double-click on photo to enlarge

Zabriskie Point: Double-click on photo to enlarge

Death Valley: The Racetrack and Ubehebe Crater

The Racetrack, Death Valley, taken from The Grandstand.  Double-click photo to enlarge.

The Racetrack, Death Valley, taken from The Grandstand. Double-click photo to enlarge.

The Racetrack is the world-famous playa upon which rocks move mysteriously.  Scientists believe that strong winds blow the rocks across the playa under icy, muddy, slippery soil conditions.  A playa is the most naturally flat geological surface on the planet.  The National Park Service asks visitors not to walk on the playa when it is wet, because the resulting footprints last for years.  Driving on the playa is prohibited at all times.  I saw a few footprints and tire tracks on the playa.

The Park Service warns visitors about the risk of flat tires on Racetrack Road at every possible opportunity.  The visitor centers feature dioramas showing how small rocks protrude from the washboard road surface.  The highly competent ranger I spoke with, Mr. Langford, advised me to limit my speed to 15-20 mph and my tires would be fine.  He was right.  I did, however, cross paths with a

Racetrack Playa, moving rock specimen.  Double-click on photo to enlarge.

Racetrack Playa, moving rock specimen. Double-click on photo to enlarge.

group in another SUV who sustained 2 flat tires.  “People try to drive 40 mph, and the rocks tear through tires at that speed,” Langford explained.

A few miles north of The Racetrack, I momentarily heard a deafening roar directly above my vehicle.  An F-16 at seemingly eye level streaked past heading east, perpendicular to my direction of travel, a 30-foot afterburner flame shooting from its engine.  It was turning hard right to avoid hitting the mountain directly in front of it.  Having rapidly turned itself south, it shot just over the top of another mountain and dived into a valley out of sight.  This entire set of maneuvers took less than 10 seconds.  Ranger Langford had explained, with his typical enthusiasm, that fighter pilots often practice bombed drivers on Racetrack Road.  I’m glad I got to experience it!

Double-click on photo to enlarge.

Double-click on photo to enlarge.

Racetrack Playa, moving rock specimen.  Double-click on photo to enlarge.

Racetrack Playa, moving rock specimen. Double-click on photo to enlarge.

Racetrack Playa, moving rock specimen.  Double-click on photo to enlarge.

Racetrack Playa, moving rock specimen. Double-click on photo to enlarge.

Racetrack Playa, moving rock specimen.  Double-click on photo to enlarge.

Racetrack Playa, moving rock specimen. Double-click on photo to enlarge.

Death Valley: Culture of Rocks

The Culture of Rocks

The Cathedral, Death Valley: Double-click on photo to enlarge.

The Cathedral, Death Valley: Double-click on photo to enlarge.

Often we admire the waterfall, the river, beautiful trees, perhaps a meadow or wildflowers.  These features are the main attraction, while rocks, at best, fade into the background.  In Death Valley the rocks rule.  Death Valley’s rocks exude a commanding presence in every direction and every location.  The immensely sized mountains and canyon walls colored in vivid reds, blacks, greens, grays, and tans compel the visitor’s attention.  It is not a matter of a few impressive formations scattered around the park.  Death Valley is filled with flashy colored rocks sporting exotic and chiseled appearances that defy description.  See additional photos below.

Golden Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click on photo to enlarge.

Golden Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click on photo to enlarge.

Golden Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click on photo to enlarge.

Golden Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click on photo to enlarge.

Golden Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click on photo to enlarge.

Golden Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click on photo to enlarge.

Golden Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click on photo to enlarge.

Golden Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click on photo to enlarge.

Golden Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click on photo to enlarge.

Golden Canyon, Death Valley: Double-click on photo to enlarge.

Slab City, California (Traveled Feb. 2013)

Slab City is an abandoned Marine Corps base that has been taken over by squatters.  The demographic runs the gamut from hippies to meth addicts to a solar panel dealer and a Tiki bar proprietor.

I’m writing this from Slab City, my first night here.  I’ve been taken in by the East Jesus artist colony, which is 5 guys who appreciate guns, snakes, campfires, and “free” living.  The sculpture garden features a wide array of art made from all manner of junk.  Frank, the leader, gives me a tour in which he demonstrates an encyclopedic knowledge of each piece.  He says they “control” 5 acres to the west and I can camp anywhere in that area.  I set up near the center of the colony instead, behind an old shack and about 20 yards inside the EJ border fence made of old tires.  There is a “clothing optional” shooting range at the bottom of the 15-foot deep dry wash.  We all sat around a fire and ate dinner which was cooked in their kitchen stove — stir fry and focaccia bread.  They have a gas grill, electric, wifi, showers, and toilets here, unique in the slabs.  A sticker on the kitchen wall reads, “What would Jesus Bomb?”  A quote from dinner conversation was, “In rust we trust, and if it don’t rust, burn it” — which is what we did with our dinner plates.  The Chocolate Mountains Aerial Gunnery Range is close by, and we heard some jets earlier today.

Mopar, an older gentleman who specializes in “community relations” with the rest of the slabs, describes Slab City as “The Land of Misfit Toys” — meaning the people who live here. The youngest resident, Drew, is spending 2 hours daily learning to play the guitar by ear — no books or instructor.  The logic is that he will either learn to play it, or learn that he can’t.  When I mentioned it to Mopar, he agreed that an instructional book might be helpful, and said he would “put out a feeler” to the rest of the slabs.

The next morning I walked to the canal at 7 am just to stretch my legs, and it happened the Marine Harrier jets were starting bombing practice.  I climbed a hill and had a great view.  The jets flew in two at a time with a high decibel, low-pitch roar that made my ears feel as if they almost, not quite, needed earplugs. The Harriers came in low and fast, diving in to release their bombs and then pulling the nose level before making a series of hard turns left and right, practicing evasion of anti-aircraft defenses.  The second jet in the formation would often make these extreme evasive maneuvers before releasing his bombs, if I observed correctly — seemingly to provide a cover of distraction for the first jet as it released its bombs, then the first jet seemed to cover for the second.  All of this was done at high speed and apparent altitudes of a couple hundred to a thousand feet.  I could clearly see the nose, body, wings, and tail of the jets during the maneuvers.

After each bomb run came 6-9 ground- shaking explosions that made a low-pitched, raspy noise in the eardrums.  The explosions came in rapid succession similar to setting off a string of firecrackers.  Then there was a tall cloud of black, brown, and grey smoke.  I could not see the targets or the explosions because they were behind hills.  I believe I observed 4 separate sorties before heading back to East Jesus for breakfast.  This was an exciting, educational show.  Frank, the East Jesus leader, said such training exercises happen about once a week.

Joshua Tree National Park, CA Part 2 (Traveled Feb. 2013)

Cholla Cactus Garden

Cholla Cactus Garden

I awoke to freezing temperatures and relentless driving wind.  I drove about 15 miles to the park’s Cholla Cactus Garden.  Here, a dense stand of chest- high teddy bear cholla covered an area somewhat larger than a football field.  There were several conspicuous signs warning visitors of the especially dangerous nature of the cholla cactus and the potential for painful injuries.  I walked the trail through the middle of the cactus garden, stopping at several points to observe the nuances of each section.  The setting was relaxing and beautiful.  Trail signs explained that the black sections on some of the plants did not indicate death; they were in fact alive and healthy.  Another sign explained that cacti in general will only grow in sections of desert that receive regular hard rains.  This is why much of the desert southwest is devoid of cacti.

Cholla Cactus Garden

Cholla Cactus Garden

I spent the afternoon hiking to the 49 Palms Oasis on the northern end of the park.  Roughly 3 miles from the parking lot I arrived at a grove of 40+ foot tall palms growing along a trickling stream.  The scene starkly contrasted with the surrounding barren, brown desert.

The Marines have a large base several miles to the north called Twentynine Palms.  The road to the 49 Palms trailhead passed through a residential area in which many homes flew American and USMC flags along with other patriotic memorabilia.  This was a heartening scene in a time when so many Americans don’t appreciate their country.

Cholla Cactus Garden

Cholla Cactus Garden

Joshua trees near the center of the park

Joshua trees near the center of the park

49 Palms Canyon Trail

49 Palms Canyon Trail

49 Palms Oasis

49 Palms Oasis

49 Palms Oasis

49 Palms Oasis

49 Palms Oasis

49 Palms Oasis